in Book Reviews, tech

Book Review: Daemon

Daniel Suarez's Daemon

I picked up the book Daemon, by Daniel Suarez a few months ago and read it within a few days. Since then I’ve been thinking about writing a book review for it. It’s an interesting book and requires a deep analysis of the topics that Daniel touched in the book. Suarez used his in-depth knowledge of the world of IT and his impressive imagination to build a world where bots, automated software running wild on computers, control not just the usual stuff – bank transactions, toll booth cameras, and Google’s search algorithms, but also complete corporations¬†and the fate of millions of people. This world has mad men like Sobol, a legendary game designer who creates a bot to control everything in the new world and I mean, everything. From sourcing professional killers from seedy chatrooms and creating new weaponry part by part from the hands of young 3D printer owners looking for some extra cash, the software controls the fate of many corporations and important people around the world, destroying whoever stands a chance against it. It even does the good task of killing major spam creators, just to be able to have a better control of the Internet.

The book is well written. Suarez manages to grasp your attention for a long time, even if you’re an Internet junkie with the attention span of a goldfish. His characters are well outlined, his story line is a continuous joy ride, with every piece of amazing added in there to make it the perfect story for a tech lover. Games that recruit people based on their kill percentages, Bio-suits that can control cars and the ultimate truth that everyone works for the corporates, it’s all there. But, as always, there’s the low-point. Unfortunately for the reader, this point comes at the ending of the story. The ending is weak, to say the least. It has all the elements of a block buster but it seems that Suarez pulled the plug on his creativity too soon. I can saw this with certainty because initially, Suarez printed this book himself. This means he had the time and opportunity to build any ending he wanted, but he left it where it stands today.

Over all, read it, if only for it’s amazing insight at the technology that already stands tall amongst us and for what’s to come or may already be here. Interested readers can head to¬†thedaemon.com to find out more about the book.